Media Coverage

Loss Redemption and Memory

JLife Magazine coverage by Deborah Noble about the Holocaust Torah scroll housed at Temple Beth David. The scroll holds special resonance for the congregation, which sustained a neo-Nazi attack nearly 40 years ago and had to rebuild.

“Our synagogue was attacked during Chanukah of 1980,” explains Rabbi Alan Lachtman. “A couple of neo-Nazis broke into the sanctuary and set it on fire.” The two arsonists were arrested and jailed, and one of them, incredibly, later renounced white supremacy and Nazism after having met Jewish doctors and inmates in prison. and later worked with the FBI to foil further attacks. He made a public and televised apology to Temple Beth David and Rabbi Lachtman in 1983.


 

Rabbi Lachtman honored for 40 years of service to the Jewish Community.
Jewish Journal coverage by Ryan Torok

The Jewish Federation of Greater San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys honored Rabbi Alan Lachtman of Temple Beth David during the 2018 Honoring Community Leaders Brunch at the Courtyard Marriott on Oct. 21. The gathering feted Lachtman for his 42-plus years as Temple Beth David’s spiritual leader and for his contributions to the greater community. Article in the Jewish Journal by Ryan Torok here. 

 


Temple Beth David of the San Gabriel Valley Celebrates 70 Years, an article in JLIFE SGPV magazine by Rabbi Alan Lachtman

Congregational beginnings are not usually followed by the full realization of the founders’ visions and dreams. At times it takes a few decades or more for the hopes and visions of those who were the original founding members and visionaries to come to fruition. So is the story of Temple Beth David. It is a wonderfully positive story with many lessons having been learned and passed down. Click

here


Yom HaShoah Commemoration, Coverage in the Outlook Newspaper and LA Times

Yom HaShoah is commemorated at our school, with first-hand stories of survivors. In a joint TBD-LCUSD Holocaust remembrance program, survivor of Warsaw Ghetto Dr. Anne Warman joined our school, while survivors Leon Prochnik of Krakow and Trudie Strobel of Lotz Ghetto spoke at the La Cañada High School Auditorium. The program, named “Beyond Fear, Resilience, Resistance and Bravery: Stories of Trauma and Tragedies Through the Holocaust,” was attended by 400 middle school students, and 50 professionals. The program was covered in theOutlook Newspaper and in the LA Times.

 

 


TBD + PJTC FRIENDSHIP DAY By Gal Kessler Rohs

When I became Temple Beth David’s new Education Director, and began working, Rabbi Alan Lachtman suggested I contact Pasadena Jewish Temple & Center’s new Education Director, Rabbi Aimee Gerace,  to see if we could bring our two schools together for a Jewishly warm day of friendship and learning.  Read here the article in JLife’s SGPV magazine, about how our students collaborated with PJTC‘s students in friendship.

 


EVERYTHING RELATES TO JUDAISM by Gal Kessler Rohs

Years ago, when I first stepped foot in one of the SGPV synagogues, a wise educator, Debby Singer, became my trusted mentor. She enlightened me, by proclaiming that “everything relates to Judaism”. Read here JLife SGPV’s magazine about how it is that everything relates to Judaism, and about our attempt to strive for a Jewishly Warm and Relevant experience as Jews.


A Sandbox is Jewishly Warm and Relevant by Gal Kessler Rohs

I respect the array of educational philosophies out there in the SGPV, and no doubt we adults are educating our children in the best way we see fit. Our children are for the most part growing into strong resilient beings, based upon the Judaic values we provide them, yet providing ample traditional play time using nature’s gifts, I feel, will enhance our children’s growth, Jewishly. So why IS a sandbox Jewishly warm and relevant? Read my statement and its advocacy in SGPV’s JLife here.

 

 


Welcoming Klal Israel to Temple Beth David, JLife Article by Rabbi Alan Lachtman and Gal Kessler Rohs, Education Director

“We traditionally speak at our Seder table about four sons: the wise, the wicked, the simple, and the one who does not know how to ask. Orthodox Jews traditionally speak also of a fifth conspicuous Jewish child who has no interest in Yiddishkeit, and is thus absent from the Seder table. The Lubavitcher Rebbe calls upon us Jews to bring forth this fifth child “for no Jewish child should be forgotten and given up.”

As progressive Jews, we, at Temple Beth David, value those Hasidic words, and extend upon them. Rabbi Alan Lachtman, teaches us to consider this fifth absent child, as symbolizing the absent children of klal Israel. This child is therefore also the sixth, seventh, and thousandth child, who has yet to find meaning in our customs, and join us.” Click here to read the full coverage.