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Event Submission Form

Event Submission Form

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B’nai Mitzvah Training

B'nah Mitzvah is the plural of Bar/Bat Mitzvah. This life event marks the promotion of a child onto the path of adulthood as a "Son of the Commandment,” Bar Mitzvah or "Daughter of the Commandment," Bat Mitzvah.  Jewish tradition says that when children turn 13, they take on the responsibilities B'nah Mitzvah is the plural of Bar Mitzvah which means "Son of the Commandment” and Bat Mitzvah means "Daughter of the Commandment." Under Jewish Law, children are not obligated to observe the commandments, although they are encouraged to do so. Jewish tradition says that when children turn 13, they take on the responsibilities in the community.

This ceremony formally marks the assumption of obligations and rights to take part in leading the religious services, to generally to be an active member of the Jewish community, and be a more responsible citizen in the larger world.

 The ceremony requires study and discipline on the part of the child.

  1. Learning enough Hebrew to read from the Torah
  2. Master enough Jewish history and law to understand the context of what they're reading.
  3. Attend a required number of services during the year leading up to their B'nai Mitzvah.
  4. Take classes and/or work one-on-one with their rabbi, teacher, or tutor focusing on their portion of the Torah, to learn the Hebrew and trope (the traditional “melodies”), the meaning of the prayers, and the relevance of his Torah portion to the world long ago and to today.  In addition, there is usually a “mitzvah project” which the child undertakes to demonstrate the gratitude he feels for his life’s blessings,fulfilling  the mitzvah “Tikkun olam” -- the religious obligation to repair the world.

B’nai Mitzvah Program

B'nai Mitzvah Family Handbook

B'nai Mitzvah Prayers

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Mission

Temple Beth David is the home of a Reform Jewish congregation that embraces Judaism’s values and traditions including spiritual discovery, educational richness, community loving kindness, personal responsibility and welcomes all Jews and interfaith families committed to living a Jewish life.

At Temple Beth David,

We believe that worship is a communal experience.

We recognize that every individual is unique and that there are many different paths by which we seek holiness.  

We strive for inclusion - Where everyone feels at home and that they belong.

We provide different types of services so that everyone can find something to which they connect - joyful song, stimulating Torah discussion, silent meditation and more.  

Whatever it is that moves you, come join us and be a part of the services you find most meaningful!

 

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Events Calendar

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